AutumnWood Farm
Where "kids" grow up right!
Kune-Kune Pigs
             
              Sow

              Boar

          Upcoming Litters

             For Sale


 
​We are heading up to Oregon and Washington in May/June to pick up the newest additions to our farm for 2015!
 We are so excited to start breeding pigs!  
We are even more excited to start breeding the KuneKune Pig!!
 At this time, our first Boar and Gilt will be unregistered.  We will be raising them for our own personal meat needs, and to sell to interested buyers for meat, or pasture pets.  They do get a little                                                                                                              "too big" for the house, but fun for a backyard!
                                                         CHECK BACK STARTING NEXT SPRING FOR UPCOMING LITTERS!!

         The Kunekune Pig (pronounced "cooney cooney") is a breed known as the "Maori Pig" having been developed by the first people of New Zealand. They neared extinction in their homeland during the 1970's, two animal preservationists are credited with their conservation. The Kunekune Pig in America is finding a serious niche market for small farms, in sustainable farming systems, for permaculture, and with chefs, charcutiers, caterers, and in home butchery. 

                         The following selected facts were obtained from the "American Kune-Kune Registry" website, which will be on my                                         Links/Education page under the Mini-Nubian Button.   (The first pigs I will be raising will not be registered, however purebred)

UNIQUE CHARACTERISTICS - Kunekune Pigs are relatively small in size with boars rarely reaching much over 250 pounds.  They are varied in hair color and hair texture with ears that are pricked or semi-lop.  Extremely docile in temperament, the breed is suitable for first time pig growers.  

FEEDING - Kunekune are known to many as "the Grazing Pig" being extremely efficient on grass and not prone to root or roam.  Pasture grasses work well with very little needed in the way of supplementation.  Hay can be fed when pasture is scarce or unavailable.  Commercial pig feeds, organic or proprietary feeds, along with kitchen and garden excess all work to guarantee your pig's optimum condition.  Gestating and lactating sows as well as piglets should always get a daily ration in addition to any pasture and/or hay.
When feeding out meat pigs for sale or for your family's table, consider the reason behind the niche market for those who practice excellent husbandry.  The "alternative system" of rearing your pigs out-of-doors as was always the case in bygone days and feeding them from the orchard, garden, and kitchen not only speaks to buyers, but produces exceptional quality and taste in the pork that you produce.  If you or your neighbor has poultry or milking cattle, goats, or sheep, feed the damaged eggs and milk or whey to your pigs.  Consider getting creative and working with local businesses for sustainability for both you and them.  Contact your local restaurants, school gardens, brewery, or CSA and request their excess for your herd.  It is a win-win situation.  Your pigs will thrive.

HOUSING - Pigs need housing and shade in order to thrive in any environment.  Depending upon the climate and conditions, producers will need to provide a relatively draft free space with clean bedding and protection from sun, wind and rain.  In the coldest climates, deep straw or hay, perhaps with a layer of wood shavings underneath, will be required to keep pigs warm and dry.   There are many manufacturers that produce housing suitable for pigs.